History to 1900 (including works on slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction)

See Also separate listing on works dealing with African diaspora

History 1900 to 1940

The Harlem Renaissance

History 1940 to 1950 (including works on African Americans in WWII)

History 1950 to 1970 (including works on the Civil Rights Movement)(on separate page)

The Black Panthers (on separate page)

History 1970 to present (on separate page)

Black Identity / General works on Race and Race Relation (on separate page)

Literature and the Arts (on separate page)

African Americans and the Educational System (on separate page)

African American Sports (on separate page)

General and Miscellaneous Works (separate page)

African American Religion SEE Religions and Myths of the World

African Diaspora
Africa
Caribbean
The Movies, Race, and Ethnicity
Musical Traditions of the World (for documentaries about African American music and musicians)
Social & Political Issues in America (for documentaries about African Americans and the criminal justice system; general works on poverty and urban violence)
Women and Gender Studies (for documentaries about women of color)

African Americans in Film and Television: Books and Articles in the UCB Library

Indiana University Black Film Center/Archive

History to 1900 (including works on slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction)

The Abolitionists
A three-part made for television mini-series interweaving drama with traditional documentary-style storytelling. "Radicals. Agitators. Troublemakers. Liberators. Called many names, the abolitionists tore the nation apart in order to create a more perfect union. Men and women, black and white, Northerners and Southerners, poor and wealthy, these passionate anti-slavery activists fought body and soul in the most important civil rights crusade in American history. Written, produced and directed by Rob Rapley. 54 min. each installment. DVD X9158

The Abolitionists, Part 1. Angelina's religious struggle -- Slavery and the American economy -- The Liberator -- The postal campaign -- Garrison faces a mob -- Angelina & Theodore Weld -- Leaving the American anti-slavery society.

The Abolitionists, Part 2. Douglass escapes slavery -- Douglass flees to Great Britain -- The North Star -- Harriet's loss -- The great compromise -- Uncle Tom's cabin.

The Abolitionists, Part 3. Battle over Kansas -- Raid on Harpers Ferry -- The Civil War begins -- The Emancipation Proclamation -- Victory

Achievements in American Black History: Black Religion.
Traces the history of Black religion from its African origins. Discussion of the roots of Black religion in tribal life and beliefs, its adoption of the White church framework, and its spiritual, social, and political influence in America. 40 min. Video/C 82

African American Lives
Host: Henry Louis Gates, Jr.; features Oprah Winfrey, Chris Tucker, Quincy Jones, Sara-Lawrence-Lightfoot, Mae Jemison, T.D. Jakes, Ben Carson, Whoopi Goldberg. Listening to our past / producer and director, Jesse Sweet -- The promise of freedom / producer and director, Leslie Asako Gladsjo -- Searching for our names / producer and director, Leslie D. Farrell -- Beyond the middle passage / producer and director, Graham Judd. Music, Michael Bacon. A compelling combination of storytelling and science, this series uses genealogy, oral histories, family stories and DNA to trace the roots of eight prominent African Americans down through American history and back to Africa. Originally broadcast as a four-part television series in 2006. 240 min. DVD 5172

African Americans in the West. Lecture by Quintard Taylor
Historian and university professor Quintard Taylor presents an overview of African American history in the West and comments on his book "In search of a racial frontier, a history of African-Americans in the West.". Originally filmed on March 11, 1995. 48 min. Video/C MM247

The African Burial Ground: An American Discovery.
Explores the history and archeological excavation of a burial ground for African slaves discovered in lower Manhattan Island, New York, during construction of a Federal office building in the summer of 1991. Relates also the effect of the discovery on understanding the role of Afro-Americans in colonial American life. 1994. 116 min. Video/C 5182

Africans in America
A four part series portraying the struggles of the African people in America, from their arrival in the 1600s to the last days before the Civil War. 1998. Produced and directed by Orlando Bagwell, Susan Bellows. 90 min. each installment

Africans in America, Part 1: The Terrible Transformation.This first episode examines the origins of one of the largest forced human migrations in recorded history. After the arrival of the first Africans in Virginia in 1619, the British colonies laid the groundwork for a system of racial slavery, which generated profits that ensured the colonies' growth and survival. DVD 814; Video/C 5838

Africans in America, Part 2: Revolution. In this second episode, while the American colonies challenge Britain for independence, American slavery is challenged from within as men and women fight to define what America will be. When the War of Independence is won, black people, both enslaved and free, seize on the language of freedom even while the new nation's Constitution codifies slavery and oppression as a national way of life. DVD 814; Video/C 5839

Africans in America, Part 3: Brotherly Love. In this third episode, during the first 50 years of the new nation, freedmen and fugitive slaves in Philadelphia push the country to live up to the promises made in its Constitution. But with the invention of the cotton gin, slavery expands into America's western frontier, and a revolution in Haiti inspires slave rebellions throughout the southern United States. DVD 815; Video/C 5840

Africans in America, Part 4: Judgement Day.In this final episode, as the nation expands westward slavery becomes the most divisive issue in American life. Abolitionists struggle to bring the institution down and the nation is tested as never before. When tensions over slavery erupt into violence, Americans are forced to consider how long the country can continue as a democracy built on the profits of bondage. DVD 815; Video/C 5841

PBS web site for Africans in America

Almost Down to the Shore: African American Families During Emancipation.
Letters, diary entries, affidavits, etc. of persons associated with the emancipation of slavery read aloud; accompanied by photographs. 35 min. Video/C 1800

And Still I Rise.
Prominent black women comment on the history and experiences of the Afro-American slave woman in white European society. Includes interviews with Caron Wheeler (singer), Buchi Emecheta (novelist), Stella Dadzie (writer) along with many others. Writer/director, Ngozi Onwurah. 30 min. DVD X6681; Video/C 3368

Women Make Movies catalog description

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

The Anderson Platoon.
Follows the "Anderson Platoon," a racially integrated combat unit, for six weeks during the Vietnam War, as the soldiers eat, sleep, fight, gamble, pray and die together. 64 min. Video/C 3507

Art of Darkness.
The slaves of the Caribbean contributed not only to the wealth of their masters, but also to the cultural heritage of the British Empire. Documented through letters, paintings and poetry, the eighteenth century is shown to be both an age of high culture and of cruelty. Film shows how the art of the period romanticized the servitude of the plantation blacks as they were depicted as precious, exotic ornaments, even as they were being brutalized in real life. Director, David Maloney. 52 min. DVD X8623

Filmakers Library catalog description

The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.
Presents the story of the long life of Miss Jane Pittman, who began her life as a slave in the South and who marched for her civil rights in the 20th century at the age of 110. Director, John Korty 106 min. Video/C 144

Bigot Songs [Sound recording]
Songs of bigotry and racial prejudice recorded in the United States between 1896 and 1919. Contents: 1896: All Coons look alike to me -- Darkies temptation -- 1898: Chin Chin Chinaman -- 1900: Coon band contest -- 1901: Every darky had a raglan on -- My little zulu -- The phrenologist coon -- Coon, coon, coon --Medley of plantation songs -- Minstrels, Pt. 1 -- Hu-la hu-la cake walk -- 1902: It was the Dutch -- Mick that sent the pick -- Loo Loo-oo, my dusky loo -- 1903: It takes the Irish to beat the Dutch -- Hiawatha -- Coon wedding in So. Ga. -- I'm getting quite American, Don't you know -- Parody on 'Hiawatha' -- 1904: Navajo -- Old Black Joe -- Hebrew vaudeville -- Georgia minstrels -- California minstrels -- Darkies' awakening -- 1905: Me an' de minstrel band -- My Irish maid -- There's a dark man coming with a bundle -- New parsons at the Darktown Church -- It's allus de same in Dixie -- Coon band contest -- Heinie. 1906: Cheyenne (Shy Ann) -- Original Cohens -- Happy German twins -- 1907: If the man in the moon were a coon -- Bullfrog and the coon -- 1908: Down in the jungle -- Old Black Joe -- Over on the Jersey side -- Heinie waltzed round on his hickory limb -- 1909: An Irish-Dutch argument -- Flanagan at the vocal teacher's -- 1910: Oh, how that German could love! -- 1915: Old Black Joe -- 1916: My dreamy China lady -- 1917: Mammy's little coal black Rose -- 1918: Dark town strutter's ball -- Oriental 112 -- Colored recruits -- 1919: O death, where is thy sting? -- [No date]: Ghost of the banjo coon -- Preacher and the bear -- Eve cost Adam just one bone -- Turkey in de straw -- Here's my friend -- Bake dat chicken pie -- When that little yellow fellow plays piano -- Little Alabama coon -- Positively Mr. Gallagher, absolutley Mr. Sheehan -- Having the liar's contest -- High tone mama -- Two black crows -- Short stories by Frank Bush (Ethnic jokes) -- Pickaninny's paradise -- Argentines, the portuguese and the Greeks -- I got mine -- Run nigger run. Performers: Len Spencer, S. H. Dudley, James T. Powers, Arthur Collins, Byron G. Harlan, Bert Williams, Edward Favor, Billy Murray, Harry Macdonough, Ada Jones, Steve Porter, Ed Gallagher, Frank Bush, the Sousa Band, Duncan Sisters, Skillet Lickers. Sound/D 248

Black Athena.
Reviews evidence that the culture of ancient Greece had its origins in Africa and the East and that the West should recognize what it owes to Black and Eastern cultures. 60 min. Video/C 2162

Black Communities After the Civil War: Echoes Across the Prairie.
Historians trace the westward migration of former slaves to Oklahoma after the Civil War and examine their lives there as successful farmers and business owners. The focus is on the towns of Clearview and Boley where blacks operated thriving cotton-growing operations until 1907, when the most restrictive Jim Crow laws in the nation were passed and the activities of the Ku Klux Klan put blacks on the defensive and the Depression instigated a mass exodus to Tulsa where ghettos quickly sprang up. Historical footage "filmed 1925-1927 by Rev. S.S. Jones." c1998. 17 min. Video/C 7800

Black Indians: An American Story
This presentation brings to light a forgotten part of America's past -- the cultural and racial fusion of Native and African Americans. The film explores what brought Native Americans and African Americans together, what drove them apart, and the challenges they face today. From the Atlantic Seaboard to the Western Plains, family memories and historical highlights reveal the indelible mark of this unique ancestry and its continuing influence. Narrator, James Earl Jones. Directed by Chip Richie. c2000. 60 min. DVD X2680; vhs Video/C 7680

Black on White.
An installment of the PBS series The Story of English. Probes the roots of Black English, including the American slave trade, plantation life, the Creole influence, and Harlem's jive talk. Discusses the influence of this variety of English on white American speech and literature. 60 min. Video/C 922

Black Warriors of the Seminole
The untold story of an unusual and lasting alliance between Seminole Indians and Southern Blacks. Traces the special bond of mutual dependence that survived slavery, war and discrimination as it follows the escape of Black slaves from Georgia and South Carolina plantations to Florida where they integrated into the Seminole Indian tribes. The Seminoles and Blacks fought side by side against enraged slave owners and the U.S. Government. 1990. 30 min. Video/C 5487

Blacks Britannica.
Presents an analysis of racism within the context of British history and the post-war crises of the British economy. Produced by David Koff and Musindo Mwinyipembe. c1978 56 min. DVD 7122 [preservation copy]; VHS Video/C 157

Brazil: An Inconvenient History
Few realize that Brazil was actually the largest participant in the slave trade in the New World. Forty percent of all slaves that survived the Atlantic crossing were destined for Brazil and at one time half of the population of Brazil were slaves. It was the last country to officially abolish slavery in 1888. This production charts Brazil's history of slavery using original texts, letters, accounts and decrees, with commentary by historians, anthropologists and others who recount the effect of centuries of slavery on Brazil today. Written and directed by Phil Grabsky. 2000. 47 min. Video/C 7658

Filmakers Library catalog description

[Brown, John] John Brown's Holy War.
A look inside the abolitionist, John Brown: a complex man, farmer, warrior, and avenging angel, revealing the man behind the legend. He is the father of American terrorism-- and an inspiration to the Civil Rights movement. More than 150 years after his execution, questions swirl around John Brown: was he a madman or a martyr? A bloodthirsty fanatic or a great American hero? Draws on interviews with historians and writers and includes commentary on John Brown, Frederick Douglas, James Redpath, Henry David Thoreau, Henry A. Wise and the Secret Six with coverage of the Pottawatomie Massacre, the Missouri Raid, the Harpers Ferry Raid and the hanging of John Brown. 1999. 90 min. Video/C 6980

[Brown, John] Mean To Be Free: John Brown's Black Nation Campaign.
Film tracing through historic photographs, artworks, poetry and modern scenes the causes and consequences of the attack by abolitionist John Brown on the arsenal at Harper's Ferry, Va., October 16, 1859. 53 min. Video/C 987

Dark Passages.
A mixture of interviews, slave narratives, and dramatization tell the story of the impact of the Atlantic slave trade. Takes the viewer from the House of Slaves on Goree Island off the coast of Dakar, Senegal, to the village of Juffere on the Gambia River, the ancestral home of Alex Haley of "Roots" fame. Director, Wally Ashby. 1990. 60 min. DVD X5406; Video/C 5894

The Different Drummer.
Using rare photographs, archival footage, and interviews with Black military personnel, tells of the importance of Black soldiers from the Civil War to World War I. 58 min. DVD 4959 (preservation copy); also vhs Video/C 1010

Digging for Slaves.
Provides many fascinating and surprising details at excavations of 18th-century slave quarters on Middleburg Plantation near Charleston; at Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson, whose slave holdings seem so irreconcilable with his expressed views on human freedom; and at Colonial Williamsburg, which until recently suppressed information about the lives of the slaves, who made up over half the town's population. Dist.: Films Media Group. 1989. 50 min. DVD 8656; vhs Video/C 4135

Dr. Toer's Amazing Magic Lantern Show (American Social History Project)
This film examines the struggle to realize the promise of freedom in the years following the Civil War, as depicted by ex-slave J.W. Toer and his traveling picture show. The show featured music and stories of the black people before, during and after the Civil War. Especially focuses on the misrepresentation by the North of the former slaves and the progress of Reconstruction. DVD X2345; vhs Video/C 5831

Doing as They Can.(American Social History Project) )
Part four in a film series which explores the central role working men and women have played in the key events of American history. In this segment a fugitive woman slave describes her life, work, and day-to-day resistance on a North Carolina planation during the 1840s and 1850s. 1987. 30 min. DVD X2340; vhs Video/C 5829

Family Across the Sea.
Film examines how scholars have uncovered the remarkable connections between the Gullah people of South Carolina and the people of Sierra Leone and how the Gullahs incorporated many aspects of African culture including the language into the daily life of the plantations. Film concludes with a delegation of Gullah people traveling from the United States to Sierra Leone to trace the roots of their heritage. 56 min. Video/C 3782

CINE Film & Video Awards 1991 (Golden Eagle).
American Film & Video Festival 1992 (Blue Ribbon).
National Educational Film & Video Festival 1991 (Silver Apple).

Description from California Newsreel catalog

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Family Name.
A film by Macky Alston. As a child growing up in Durham, North Carolina, Macky Alston never questioned why all the other Alstons in his school were black. Now, after twenty-five years, he has gone back to unravel the mystery. In this documentary of race relations, Alston travels to family reunions, picnics, housing projects, churches, graveyards & the original Alston plantations to find people who share his family name. 1997. 89 min. Video/C 5581

Flight to Freedom.
Between 1790 and 1860, thousands of slaves fled the South for liberation on the "Underground Railroad". In addition to examining archival photographs, records and artifacts and interviews with national experts and descendants of slaves, conductors, and abolitionists, this program includes examples of spirituals sung by slaves as part of the "code" system, and visits homes which were used as shelters. The program highlights Rochester, New York, which was at the heart of the railroad, where passengers were hidden by Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, Harriet Tubman and others. 120 min. Video/C 4136

Fort Mose: A New Chapter in American History.
Tells the story of the first legally sanctioned settlement for free Africans in America, providing important evidence that African-American colonial history extended far beyond slavery and oppression. This program traces the kidnapping of Africans, their sale as slaves in the "New World" and their escape to Spanish Florida and freedom. 16 min. 1992. Video/C 5511

Four Hundred Years Without a Comb.
A documentary/drama in African American history and tradition as told through various combs. Beauty is a big part of Africa and its people around the globe. The advent of slavery and the lack of combs and the ability to groom caused a social, individual, health, and spiritual death for the slaves giving rise to inferiority attitudes regarding hair, skin, nose and lips still present in African-Americans of today. In this film the emphasis is on the hairdressing of African-American women as a manifestation of this "inferior seed". Based on a book of the same title by Willie L. Morrow, published in 1973. 60 min. Video/C 7523

Frederick Douglass: When the Lion Wrote History.
Archival materials and autobiographical writings are used to present the life story of Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave whose freedom was bought by supporters he met on a speaking tour in England, who became a journalist, publisher, diplomat and a passionate leader in the early fight for civil rights. Producer/director, Orlando Bagwell ; executive producer, Tamara E. Robinson ; narration written by Steve Fayer. 90 min. DVD X1394 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 3896

Freedom!
A documentary series chronicling the epic journey of America's commitment to liberty and the idea of freedom. Based on the book series A History of US by Joy Hakim. c2003. 52 min. each installment

Episode 5: The Declaration of Independence declares, "All men are created equal," but there is a glaring exception -- America's slaves. DVD 2196

Episode 6: The most terrible war in America's history is fought over the future of slavery in our nation. Looks at the issue of slavery, the abolition movement and the Civil War. DVD 2196

Episode 7: After the Civil War political turmoil takes place in Washington D.C. and a new age of segregation begins. DVD 2196

From Fields of Promise
A historical documentary of the African-American farmers of Gee's Bend, Alabama. First as slaves, then as "freed men," and finally as landowners, the Black farmers of Gee's Bend and their descendants have lived on and farmed the same land since 1845. They have experienced the demise of slavery, struggled with Jim Crow, were felled by the Great Depression, were enfranchised by a "social experiment," and participated at the center of the Civil Rights movement. Also discusses efforts by descendants of slaves in Gee's Bend and the Pettyway Plantation, to be able to own part of the land where their ancestors worked. Produced, written, and directed by Bruce Kuerten, John DiJulio, M.G. Trend. c1993. 57 min. Video/C MM817

From Florida to Coahuila: The History of the Black Seminoles. (De Florida a Coahuila: la Historia de los Mascogos)
Tells the story of the Mascogos, known in the United States as the Black Seminoles, descendants of runaway slaves who made common cause with Seminole Indians. After a long migration they came to the northern state of Coahuila, Mexico in 1850 escaping from the harsh living conditions of the North. Here they negotiated with the government to defend the border in exchange for tracts of land and citizenship. 2002. 50 min. Video/C MM397

From Slavery to Freedom
Through an overview of slavery throughout the ages, tells the story of "the world's unfinished journey from slavery to freedom." Features archival film footage with commentary by authors, academics and historians. Produced and written by Mark Page. Supplementary feature accompanying: Adventures of Young Indiana Jones. 31 min. DVD X233

Garifuna Journey
Presents the rich culture and fascinating trajectory of the Garifuna of Belize--descendents of Carib Indians and Africans who successfully resisted slavery. This celebratory documentary presents their history from both the outsider and insider vantage points, the result of a collaboration between the Chicago filmmakers and the Garifuna community. Testimonials by members of the Garifuna are intercut with scenes of cooking, dancing, eating, expressions of their spirituality and other rituals. A documentary by Andrea E. Leland and Kathy L. Berger. Dist.: New Day Films. 1998. 46 min. Video/C 5622

Gullah Tales.
Set in the rural South around 1830, a slave storyteller entertains plantation children with folktales. Film examines the role of Gullah in African-American storytelling and American history. 22 min. Video/C 2880

Homecoming: Sometimes I Am Haunted by Memories of Red Dirt and Clay
A documentary film by Charlene Gilbert exploring the history of ownership of farm lands by African Americans from Reconstruction to the present day. Their struggle for land of their own pitted them against both the Southern white power structure and the federal agencies responsible for helping them. As part of Reconstruction, Congress alloted 45 million acres of land to former slaves but little land was ever actually distributed. Despite formidable obstacles one million African Americans, mostly former sharecroppers, managed to purchase over 15 million acres of land by 1910. 1998. 56 min. Video/C 5734

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Ida B.Wells: A Passion for Justice.
Chronicles the life of Ida B. Wells, an early black activist who protested lynchings, unfair treatment of black soldiers, and other examples of racism and injustice toward black Americans around the turn of the century. 1989. 58 min. DVD 3045; also VHS Video/C 1539

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Jefferson's Blood
Examines Thomas Jefferson's life in the context of his Produced and directed by Thomas Lennon; written by Shelby Steele and Thomas Lennon. ) times and looks at the contradictions in Jefferson's character, weighing the decisions he made in his private life with his public pronouncements on slavery and race-mixing. Follows the descendants of Jefferson and his slave Sally Hemings as they research their family history and sort out their place along America's blurred color line.Originally broadcast as an episode of the television program Frontline. 2000. 60 min. Video/C 8717

John Brown's Holy War.
A look inside the abolitionist, John Brown: a complex man, farmer, warrior, and avenging angel, revealing the man behind the legend. He is the father of American terrorism-- and an inspiration to the Civil Rights movement. More than 150 years after his execution, questions swirl around John Brown: was he a madman or a martyr? A bloodthirsty fanatic or a great American hero? Draws on interviews with historians and writers and includes commentary on John Brown, Frederick Douglas, James Redpath, Henry David Thoreau, Henry A. Wise and the Secret Six with coverage of the Pottawatomie Massacre, the Missouri Raid, the Harpers Ferry Raid and the hanging of John Brown. 1999. 90 min. Video/C 6980

The Klan: A Legacy of Hate in America.
Shows graphically the 120-year infamy of the Ku Klux Klan's reign of terror. 30 min. Video/C 3242

The Klan: The Invisible Empire. (CBS Reports)
Shortly before this program was filmed in 1965, Klansmen were implicated in the murders of five people. Here Charles Kuralt presents an in-depth look at the Klan, featuring its history, its influence, the application process, and rare coverage of an initiation rite. Kuralt asks Klan leaders how they can avoid responsibility for violence when they themselves repeatedly whip up their followers to action. Among those interviewed are Alabama Attorney General Richmond Flowers, KKK Imperial Wizard Robert Shelton, and Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach.Originally aired on the CBS Television Network on September 21, 1965. Dist. Cinema Guild. 60 min. Video/C 8991

The Language You Cry In: The Story of a Mende Song . (Library of African Cinema.)
The film tells an amazing scholarly detective story reaching across hundreds of years and thousands of miles from 18th century Sierra Leone to the Gullah people of present-day Georgia. It recounts the even more remarkable saga of how African Americans retained links with their African past through a song, a burial hymn of the Mende people brought by slaves to the rice plantations of the Southeast coast more than two hundred years ago. In English and Mende with English subtitles. 53 min. DVD 9530; vhs Video/C 6295

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Collings, Jane. "The Language You Cry In." The Oral History Review Vol. 28, No. 1 (Winter, 2001), pp. 115-118 UC users only
Thomas-Houston, Marilyn M. "The Language You Cry In." American Anthropologist, New Series, Vol. 101, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 826-828 UC users only

The Massachusetts 54th Colored Infantry.
This film tells the story of the first officially sanctioned regiment of Northern Black soldiers in the Civil War. 60 min. DVD 4900; also vhs Video/C 2342

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Shearer, Jacqueline. "How Deep, How Wide? Perspectives on the Making of The Massachusetts 54th Colored Infantry." In: Black Women Film and Video Artists / edited by Jacqueline Bobo. pp: 109-123. New York: Routledge, 1998. AFI Film Readers. (Main Stack PN1998.2.B57 1998)

Mean To Be Free: John Brown's Black Nation Campaign.
Film tracing through historic photographs, artworks, poetry and modern scenes the causes and consequences of the attack by abolitionist John Brown on the arsenal at Harper's Ferry, Va., October 16, 1859. 53 min. Video/C 987

Motherland: A Genetic Journey
Cut off from their ancestry by the three-hundred-year-long slave trade which uprooted 12 million people from Africa, three people are given the opportunity, through DNA searches, to reconnect with their roots. Through advances in DNA research and with the help of laboratories in the UK and America, the possibility arises that with a swab from the inside of a person's cheek they can trace back twelve or thirteen generations to the tribe of their ancestors. In this ground-breaking search three people discover their roots in Africa and the Caribbean. A film by T. Jackson and A. Baron. c2003. 90 min. DVD 4626

Filmakers Library catalog description

Motherland: Moving On
The film "Motherland: a genetic journey," followed three people of African descent who traced their roots through DNA testing. Shot in the UK, USA, Africa and Jamaica, this film picks up their story two years later. Mark discovers that his ancestors belonged to the Kanuri tribe but he cannot communicate with them since there is a language barrier. Beaula learns that she has ancestors that belong to more than one tribe and some of the people are only interested in what gifts she can offer them. Jacqueline visits English cousins who are white who accept her as part of the family. All three participants feel enriched by their new discoveries but understand that DNA tracing may lead to complicated emotional discoveries. A film by T. Jackson and A. Baron. c2003. 60 min. DVD 4627

Filmakers Library catalog description

Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property
Evaluates the authenticity of the earliest source, "The Confessions of Nat Turner", assembled by Thomas R. Gray, a white Virginia lawyer from jailhouse interviews. It then follows the controvery over the Nat Turner story played out through history. Alvin Poussaint and Ossie Davis recall how Nat Turner became a hero in the Black community. Religious scholar Vincent Harding and legal scholar Martha Minow reflect on America's attitudes toward terrorism. One of the most bitter race battles of the 1960s is reexamined, when William Styron published his novel, The Confessions of Nat Turner. c2002. 58 min. DVD 3040; also VHS Video/C 9445

Description from California Newsreel catalog

The Odyssey of Captain Healy.
Mike Healy, born a slave on a Georgia plantation in 1839, ran way to sea winding up on San Francisco's Barbary Coast. With the purchase of the Alaska Territory Healy's career took off. Passing as a white man on board the cutter Bear, he represented the U.S. government and its justice in the Artic. He charted and patrolled the treacherous waters of the Bering Sea, confronted the rum-runners and poachers and foresaw the extermination of marine animals caused by unrestrained harvesting. He contended with the devastation wreaked upon the Eskimos and was instrumental in bringing reindeer to the Arctic. Film includes extensive rare archival footage of arctic conditions and history. 57 min. Video/C 6298

On My Own: The Traditions of Daisy Turner.
Presents the life of a daughter of a former slave, 102-year-old Daisy Turner. She recalls childhood incidents and her father's Civil War experiences and talks about life in her homestead in Vermont. Folklorist Jane Beck fills in details about traditions preserved in the Turner family. 28 min. Video/C 2163

Filmakers Library catalog description

Prince Among Slaves
In 1788, a slave ship sailed from the Gambia River with hundreds of men, women and children bound in chains. Eight months later, a handful of survivors were sold in Natchez, Mississippi. One of them made an astonishing claim: he was a prince of an African kingdom larger and more developed than the newly formed United States. The true story of an African prince who endured the humiliation of slavery without losing his dignity or hope of freedom. In 1828, by the order of President John Quincy Adams and Secretary of State Henry Clay, he was freed after spending 40 years in slavery. Based on the book Prince among slaves by Terry Alford (MAIN: E444.I25 A78 1986). Directed, produced and written by Andrea Kalin. 2008. 60 min. DVD X418

Reconstruction: The Second Civil War.
Tells the story of how ordinary Americans struggled to reconstruct their lives in the years immediately following the Civil War. Shows the struggles and triumphs of both African Americans and whites in the North and the South. Originally broadcast on PBS as two episodes of the television program The American experience, Jan. 12-13, 2004. Dist.: PBS. 180 min. DVD 4342

Release Me O' Lord: Black Indian Mardi Gras
It's Mardi Gras morning in New Orleans, Louisiana, and Black Indian tribes are dancing and singing their way through neighborhood streets. The performace features elaborate costumes, dance and verbal battles as the Black Indian tribes of New Orleans perform dances, music and songs to symbolically triumph over oppression, as their Maroon ancestors actually did over the evil institution of slavery. Written and produced by Teri S. Massoth. 1999. 15 min. Video/C 8710

Remembering Slavery: African Americans Talk About Their Personal Experiences of Slavery and Emancipation [Sound Recording]
These tapes are published in conjunction with the book Remembering slavery: African Americans talk about their personal experiences of slavery and emancipation. Live recordings and dramatic readings of interviews with former slaves. The original recordings were made by interviewers from the Federal Writers' Project in the early 1930s and placed in the Library of Congress. They have now been re-mastered and made available to the American public. 139 min. Sound/C 1372

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow
A 4-part series offering the first comprehensive look at race relations in America between the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement presenting the context in which the laws of segregation known as the "Jim Crow" system originated and developed. A film by Bill Jersey, c2002. 56 min. each installment

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Program one, Promises betrayed (1865-1896). As reconstruction ended African Americans' efforts to assert their rights began to be repressed. Whites succeeded in passing laws that segregated and disfranchised African Americans which they enforced with violence. This first episode recounts the black response by documenting the work of early African American civil rights leaders including Booker T. Washington, anti-lynching crusader Ida B. Wells and others. DVD 3048; vhs Video/C 9424

Fighting Back (1896-1917). Illustrates the early rise of a successful black middle class in the late 19th century and the determination of white supremacists to destroy fledgling black political power. Growing oppression had a profound effect on a professor at Atlanta University, W.E.B. Du Bois and a teenage Walter White, both of whom would become leaders in the newly founded National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. DVD 3048; vhs Video/C 9425

Roots.
An adaptation of Alex Haley's Roots, in which a Black American searches for his family roots by tracing his family's history from the mid-18th century when one of his ancestors, Kunta Kinte, was captured and sold into slavery. Film follows the struggle for freedom that began with the boy's abduction to America and continued throughout the generations that followed. 90 min. ea. DVD 5489; vhs Video/C 2900:1-6

Description of series from the Encyclopedia of Television

Roots of Resistance: A Story of the Underground Railroad.
Recounts the story of the underground railroad through narratives of escaped slaves. Includes interviews with descendants of slaves and slave holders of Somerset Place, a plantation in North Carolina, who describe the personal danger and terrible risk involved in each slave's departure. Directed by Orlando Bagwell. 2005. 58 min. DVD X379; vhs Video/C 1538

Search for Roots Video/C 662:1-2

Shared History
Descendants of slaves and slave owners of Woodlands Plantation, now the remnants of an antebellum estate in South Carolina, have for generations passed down stories about the on-going relationship between their ancestors. While independently researching their families' history, three descendants meet and begin to uncover the mythologies about the old connection through family interviews and archival evidence. Shared history provides a keyhole-view of the encounters and conversations of the living descendants who come together at the plantation to explore the realities of their 260-year-old relationship. 2005. 57 min. DVD 5188

Slave Island: New York's Hidden History
Examines the excavation of an 18th century slave cemetery in downtown Manhattan. Scholars and leading experts conduct archaeological and forensic analyses of the remains of nearly 400 African Americans slaves who were forced to serve either the Dutch West India Company or English masters. Uses dramatic reenactments, early maps, and documents from slave traders to piece together the history of slavery in the city of New York. Dist.: Films Media Group.2004. 49 min. DVD 5401

Slavery and the Making of America.
Directed and written by Dante J. James; series producer, Dante J. James. Dist.: PBS. c2004. ca. 60 min. each installment.

The Downward Spiral. Episode one opens in the 1620s with the introduction of 11 men of African descent and mixed ethnicity into slavery in New Amsterdam. Working side by side with white indentured servants, these men labored to lay the foundations of the Dutch colony that would later become New York. There were no laws defining the limitations imposed on slaves at this point in time. Enslaved people, such as Anthony d'Angola, Emmanuel Driggus, and Frances Driggus could bring suits to court, earn wages, and marry. But in the span of a hundred years, everything changed. By the early 18th century, the trade of African slaves in America was expanding to accommodate an agricultural economy growing in the hands of ambitious planters. After the violent Stono Rebellion many colonies adopted strict "black codes" transforming the social system into one of legal racial oppression. DVD 3918

Liberty in the Air. Episode 2. From the 1740s to the 1830s, the institution of slavery continued to support economic development. As the slave population reproduced, American planters became less dependent on the African slave trade. Ensuing generations of slaves developed a unique culture that blended elements of African and American life. Episode two follows the paths of several African Americans, including Thomas Jefferson's slave Jupiter, Colonel Tye, Elizabeth Freeman, David Walker, and Mariah Stewart, as they respond to the increasingly restrictive system of slavery. At the core of this episode is the Revolutionary War, an event which reveals the contradictions of a nation seeking independence while simultaneously denying freedom to its black citizens. DVD 3919

Seeds of Destruction. One by one the Northern states, led by Vermont in 1777, adopted laws to abolish and phase out slavery. Simultaneously, slavery in the Southern United States entered the period of its greatest expansion. Episode three, which starts at the beginning of the 1800s, examines slavery's increasing divisiveness in America as the nation develops westward and cotton replaces tobacco as the country's most valuable crop. The episode weaves national events through the personal histories of three African American slaves -- Harriet Jacobs, Solomon Northup and Louis Hughes -- who not only managed to escape bondage, but also exposed the horrific realities of the slave experience in autobiographical narratives. These and other stories of physical, psychological, and sexual exploitation fed the fires of a reinvigorated abolitionist movement. With a diverse membership comprised of men and women, blacks and whites, and led by figures including Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, and Amy Post, abolitionist sentiment gathered strength in the North, contributing to the widening fissure and imminent break-up of the nation. DVD 3920

The Challenge of Freedom. Looks at Civil War and Reconstruction through the experiences of South Carolina slave Robert Smalls. It chronicles Smalls' daring escape to freedom, his military service, and his tenure as a congressman after the war. As the events of Smalls' life unfold, the complexities of this period in American history are revealed. The episode shows the transformation of the war from a struggle for union to a battle over slavery. It examines the black contribution to the war effort and traces the gains and losses of newly freed African Americans during Reconstruction. The 13th amendment abolished slavery in 1865, the 14th and 15th amendments guaranteed black civil rights, and the Freedmen's Bureau offered aid to former slaves throughout the 1870s. Yet simultaneously, the formation of militant groups, such as the Ku Klux Klan threatened the future of racial equality and segregation laws began to appear across the country. Slavery's eradication had not brought an end to black oppression. DVD 3921

A Son of Africa.
A docudrama based on the book, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Oloudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vaasa the African, which was the first influential slave autobiography. When it was published in 1789, it fueled a growing anti-slavery movement in the U.S. and England. This production employs dramatic reconstruction, archival material and interviews with scholars. Equiano's narrative begins in the West African village where he was kidnapped into slavery in 1756. He was shipped to a Virginia plantation and then later sold again to a British naval officer. Here he learned to read and write, became a skilled trader, eventually bought his freedom and married into English society where he became a leading abolitionist. 1996. 28 min. DVD 3053; also VHS Video/C 4464

Description from California Newsreel catalog

The Songs Are Free.(World of Ideas with Bill Moyers)
Traces the history of communal singing and the musical repertoire rooted in the Black church -- from songs of resistance, courage, and pride to songs of determination and faith -- and explores their roles from the Underground Railroad through the Civil Rights movement and into the 1990's. 1997. 58 min. Video/C 5000

Souls of Passage.
A film based on an exhibition of the excavated Henrietta Marie, a slave ship which sank off the Florida coast in 1700. The piece traces the Henrietta Marie's trip--both the route the slave ship took and the voyage the exhibit made in its four year tour. Provides fascinating historical evidence of the slave trade in 17th century America, the conditions the slaves endured and the impact the exhibit had on current day North Carolina residents. Based on the exhibit: "A Slave ship speaks: the wreck of the Henrietta Marie" sponsored by the Mel Fisher Maritime Heritage Society. Slave narrations from the Federal Writers Project. A film by Steve Crump. 1996. 56 min. DVD 9746 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 4634

Sojourner Truth: Walking to Freedom. [Sound Recording]
Prior to the Civil War, Sojourner Truth traveled around the country on foot telling others how she was abused as a slave. 45 min. Sound/C 535

That's My Face(E minha cara)
African American filmmaker Thomas Allen Harris travels to Salvador da Bahia in search of his ancestral roots. He connects this time in Brazil with his childhood experiences living in Tanzania with his mother who went to Africa in search of a mythic motherland. Produced and directed by Thomas Allen Harris 2001. 56 min. DVD 2223

Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep South
Katrina Browne makes a troubling discovery--her New England ancestors were the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history. She and nine fellow descendants set off to retrace the Triangle Trade: from their old hometown in Rhode Island to slave forts in Ghana to sugar plantation ruins in Cuba. Step by step, they uncover the vast extent of Northern complicity in slavery while also navigating their way through the minefield of contemporary race relations. Directed, produced & written by Katrina Browne. 2008. 86 min. DVD X479

Description from California Newsreel catalog

[Turner, Daisy] On My Own: The Traditions of Daisy Turner.
Presents the life of a daughter of a former slave, 102-year-old Daisy Turner. She recalls childhood incidents and her father's Civil War experiences and talks about life in her homestead in Vermont. Folklorist Jane Beck fills in details about traditions preserved in the Turner family. 28 min. Video/C 2163

Filmakers Library catalog description

[Turner, Nat] Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property
Evaluates the authenticity of the earliest source, "The Confessions of Nat Turner", assembled by Thomas R. Gray, a white Virginia lawyer from jailhouse interviews. It then follows the controvery over the Nat Turner story played out through history. Alvin Poussaint and Ossie Davis recall how Nat Turner became a hero in the Black community. Religious scholar Vincent Harding and legal scholar Martha Minow reflect on America's attitudes toward terrorism. One of the most bitter race battles of the 1960s is reexamined, when William Styron published his novel, The Confessions of Nat Turner. c2002. 58 min. DVD 3040; also VHS Video/C 9445

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Unchained Memories: Readings From the Slave Narratives
When the Civil War ended in 1865, more than 4 million slaves were set free. By the late 1930's, 100,000 former slaves were still alive. In the midst of the Great Depression, journalists and writers traveled the country to record the memories of the last generation of African-Americans born into bondage. Over 2,000 interviews were transcribed as spoken, in the vernacular of the time, to form a unique historical record. Presented here are dramatic readings from these narratives, bringing to life the pride and Special features: original slave narrative audio recording of Fountain Hughes; biographies of the ex-slaves featured in the documentary. HBO Video, c2003. 75 min. DVD 1565

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table Notable Videos for Adults

Slave Narrative site, Library of Congress

Underground Railroad
Tells the story of the struggle to break the bonds of slavery in the American South: a story of secret codes, hidden way-stations and clandenstine "conductors." A story not of a railway, but of a loosely organized network of runaway slaves, freed blacks and anti-slavery whites, all willing to risk their lives in the name of liberty. Presenting dramatic re-creations of escapes, this documentary also chronicles the achievements of abolitionist figures Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Tubman and William Lloyd Garrison. c1999. 100 min. Video/C 9176

Unearthing the Slave Trade.
On the eve of the American Revolution, New York City had the largest number of enslaved Africans of any colonial settlement outside Charleston. Though this has seldom been acknowledged, African labor was essential in the building of New York. Today, archeological excavation of sites on both sides of the Atlantic is bringing to light aspects of the slave trade long buried in the liberal minds of those north of the Mason-Dixon line. Dist.: Films Media Group. 28 min. Video/C 4138

Up From Slavery
A seven part series documenting the history of slavery in America from colonial times to after the Civil War. America was founded upon the idea that all men are created equal and endowed by their creator with the inalienable rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The nation would pay a bloody cost for denying that right to more than twelve percent of its population. But when slavery was first brought to America's shores, this war, and even the nation it tore apart, was centuries in the future. With incredibly detailed historical reenactments, expert commentary and the stories of slavery told through first-hand accounts, this is an epic struggle 400 years in the making. Contents: Pt. 1 1619 Virginia, the first African slaves arrive -- Pt. 2 18th century colonial America and slavery under the rule of the British Empire -- Pt. 3 Slavery in the United States after the Revolution -- Pt. 4 Nat Turner's rebellion, 1831 -- Pt. 5 Abolition from the north grows -- Pt. 6. The Civil War, Emancipation Proclamation -- Pt. 7 Aftermath of the Civil War and new "freedom." Directed by Kevin R. Hershberger. c2011. 5 hr., 6 min. DVD X6928

Voices of the Gods
This documentary captures the rich legacy of ancient African religions practiced today in the United States. It provides rare insights into the practices and beliefs of the Akan and Yoruba religions and illustrates how mass media has been used to denigrate these belief systems. Includes an intimate andrespectful study of an Egungun ancestral communion ceremony and daily life in the Yoruba village of Oyotunji in Sheldon, South Carolina, the only traditional African village of its kind in the U.S. today. A film by Alfred Santana. Dist. Third World Newsreel. 1986. 60 min. Video/C 5574

[Washington, Booker T.] Booker T. Washington.
The life of Booker T. Washington, the most influential Black educational and political leader of the late 19th and early 20th Century. Talks about his stewardship of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. 30 min. Video/C 565

Whispers of Angels: A Story of the Underground Railroad
Using dramatization and commentary by scholars and historians, the program discusses the critical Eastern line of the Underground Railroad and two station masters who proved essential to its success: Thomas Garrett and William Still. Written and directed by Sharon K. Baker. 2001. 59 min. DVD X378

History to 1900 to 1930

Banished
Documentary about three communities which forcibly expelled African American residents between the Civil War and the Great Depression. Includes interviews with residents from those communities: Pierce City, Missouri; Harrison, Arkansas; Forsyth County, Georgia. Produced and directed by Marco Williams. 2007. 84 min. DVD 9366

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Flyers in Search of a Dream
Documents the adventures of early black aviators. Includes Bessie Coleman, the first Black pilot to be licensed; William J. Powell, Sr., an early promoter of airmindedness in the black community; Herbert Julian, who pursued a controversial career as showman and promoter of black aviation; and James Herman Banning, the first black pilot to successfully complete a transcontinental flight in 1932. 58 min. Video/C 5995

[Dubois, W.E.B.] W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices
In this film four prominent African-American writers each narrate a period in the life of the sociologist and author, W.E.B. Du Bois, and describe his impact on their work. They chronicle Du Bois' role as a founder of the NAACP, organizer of the first Pan-African Congress, editor of Crisis, a journal of the black cultural renaissance, and author of a series of landmark sociological studies. Anathematized during the McCarthy years, Du Bois immigrated to Ghana, the first independent African state, where he died. 1995. 116 min. DVD 3421; also on VHS Video/C 4058

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Fitzgerald, Sharon. "W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices." (television program reviews) American Visions v12, n1 (Feb-March, 1997):34 (2 pages).
Goodman, Walter. "W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices." (television program reviews) New York Times v146, n38 (Fri, Feb 7, 1997):B24(N), B17(L), col 3, 13 col
Holloway, Jonathan Scott. "The Soul of W.E.B. Dubois." American Quarterly 1997 49(3): 603-614
Leonard, John. "W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices." (television program reviews) New York v30, n5 (Feb 10, 1997):115.

[Fanon, Frantz] Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask
A film biography of Frantz Fanon, one of the most influential theorists of the anti-colonial movements of our century. Reveals not only the facts of his life but his long and tortuous inner journey. Includes interviews with family members and friends, documentary footage, readings from Fanon's work and moving dramatizations of crucial moments in his life. Film follows Fanon from his birth in Martinique in 1925, through medical school in France, to his work in Algeria where he joined the turbulent liberation struggle. Director, Isaac Julien ; written by Isaac Julien & Mark Nash c1995. 50 min. DVD 9531; vhs Video/C 4459

[Garvey, Marcus] Marcus Garvey Look For Me in the Whirlwind.
Uses a wealth of archival film, photographs and documents to uncover the story of Marcus Garvey, a Jamaican immigrant who between 1916 and 1921 built the largest black mass movement in world history. It explores his dramatic successes and failures before his fall into obscurity through interviews with people who witnessed the Garvey movement first hand more than 80 year ago as they communicate the appeal of Garvey's revolutionary ideas to a generation of African Americans. Directed by Stanley Nelson. Special DVD features: Interviews with director Stanley Nelson and editor Lewis Erskine; exclusive footage not included in the program; News articles from the Negro World; Audio recordings of Marcus Garvey speeches; video glossary of key terms from a panel of Garvey experts. 2001. 90 min. DVD X3312; Video/C 7807

Jacques, Geoffrey. "Marcus Garvey: Look for Me in the Whirlwind." Cineaste, Fall2001, Vol. 26 Issue 4, p76, 2p UC users only
Satter, Beryl. "Marcus Garvey: Look for Me in the Whirlwind." Journal of American History; Dec2001, Vol. 88 Issue 3, p1192-1193, 2p UC users only

[Garvey, Marcus] Marcus Garvey: Toward Black Nationhood
A documentary combining archival material and live interviews with Marcus Garvey, Jr., and others, which introduces the life and work of the pioneer Black nationalist leader Marcus Garvey. 45 min. Video/C 4137

Goin' to Chicago.
Chronicles the migration of African Americans from the rural South to the cities of the North and West by telling the personal stories of a group of older Chicagoans born in the Mississippi Delta who have returned to Greenville, Mississippi for a reunion with family and friends. Participants talk about their lives and their reasons for moving North. Includes historical footage of Mississippi and Chicago. 70 min. Video/C 3781

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Hellfighters: Harlem's Heroes of World War One
"For almost 300 years African Americans served a nation that would not serve them." This is the history of the 369th Infantry Regiment (the Harlem Hellfighters) the first Negro Regiment during WWI. As an American regiment they served under the French, compiling an astounding war record; the outfit was 191 days under fire, never lost a foot of ground or had a man taken prisoner. The regiment earning several unit citations along with many individual decorations for valor from the French government. The regimental band (under the direction of James Reese Europe) became famous throughout Europe, being the first to introduce the unknown music called jazz. Features archival film footage with commentary by authors, historians and military leaders. Supplementary short issued with: The Adventures of young Indiana Jones. 2007. 30 min. DVD X235

I Remember Harlem.
Traces the rise, decline, and regeneration of America's largest Black community over three centuries. 60 min. ea. Video/C 527:1-4

Inside the Ku Klux Klan: Faces of Hate
In this program, the leaders of the American Knights of the KKK and the Invisible Empire of the KKK air their views and discuss their efforts to recruit members through rallies, the Internet, and pamphlets. Civil rights crusaders, authors, representatives of the NAACP and the Anti-Defamation League, and religious and civic leaders analyze the Klan's rhetoric and ideology. Contains extensive footage of Klan rallies. Dist.: Films Media Group. 2000. 53 min. Video/C 8282

Lynching: The Heinous Past.
Documents the history of lynching in the United States. The film is punctuated by reproductions of picture postcards depicting lynches, collected by James Cameron, who has created a museum in Milwaukee dedicated to keeping alive this memory of man's inhumanity. 22 min. Video/C 9256

Description from Filmakers Library catalog

Men of Bronze.
Story of the Black American combat regiment that was recruited in Harlem and served under the Fourth French Army in World War I. 58 min. Video/C 344

Miles of Smiles: Years of Struggle.
Personal narratives of retired porters about their work and duties on the Pullman trains and about the formation of their union. Produced and directed by Jack Santino and Paul Wagner. c1982. 60 min. DVD X626; vhs Video/C 381

California Newsreels catalog description

Promised Land
Narrated by Morgan Freeman. Based on the book: The Promised Land by Nicholas Lemann ( New York: A.A. Knopf, 1991. Main Stack, Moffitt E185.6 .L36 1991) Documents the migration of rural Southern blacks from the segregated South to Chicago. 90 min. each installment

Take Me to Chicago. From Jim Crow laws to the advent of the mechanical cotton picker - rural Southern Blacks had plenty of reasons to listen to the traveling blues musicians with their siren songs of far-off Chicago and the promise of a better, freer life. Here is the greatest peace-time migration in history, seen through the eyes of those who lived it. 90 min. Video/C 4754

A Dream Deferred A rural people becomes an urban one but cultural and political gains are offset by overcrowding and the ghettoization of Blacks as politicians ignore the developing problems. Shows the influence of Martin Luther King, Jr. on the fledgling northern civil rights movement. Includes historical footage and personal interviews. Video/C 4755

Strong Men Keep a-comin' On: The Walls of Jericho. The great migration comes of age. Chicago elects its first Black mayor. Many families move into the middle class while others remained mired in an underclass. Those who made the journey examine what has been gained and what still needs to be done. Video/C 4756

Scottsboro: An American Tragedy.
In 1931, two white women stepped from a boxcar in Paint Rock, Alabama to make a shocking accusation: they had been raped by nine black teenagers on a train. So began one of the most significant legal fights of the twentieth century. The trials of the falsely accused nine young men would draw North and South into their sharpest conflict since the Civil War, yield two momentous Supreme Court decisions and give birth to the civil rights movement. Directed by Barak Goodman, Dist.: PBS. 2001. 90 min. DVD X6934l Video/C 6907

Awards
American Library Association Video Round Table Notable Videos for Adults

Struggles in Steel: A Story of African-American Steelworkers.
Interviews with more than 70 retired black steelworkerswho tell of struggles with the company, the union andwhite co-workers to break out of the black job ghetto. Film traces a century of black industrial history--theuse of blacks as strikebreakers against the all-white union during the 1892 Homestead Strike, the Great Migration of fieldworkers to the North in WorldWar I, the racial divisions between workers during theGreat Steel Strike of 1919 and the ultimate success ofthe CIO organizing drives of the 1930s. When black vets returned to the mills after WWII, they were stilllocked into the worst jobs with no rights to bid on better-paying, higher-skilled work. The steelworkersrecount how they finally won agreement in 1974 compelling the company and the union to set hiring andpromotion goals for women and minorities. 58 min. Video/C 4465

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Susceptible to Kindness: Miss Evers' Boys and the Tuskegee Syphilis Study
Examines the ethical issues raised by the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male (1932-1972). Includes excerpts from David Feldshuh's play Miss Evers boys and comments by nurses; physicians; government officials; James Jones, the author of Bad blood; and others on the issues raised by the play. Includes scenes from Illusion Theater's production of Miss Evers boys at Cornell University's Center for the Theatre Arts, August 22-31, 1991; directors, D. Scott Glasser, Michael Robbins. 1993. 45 min. Video/C MM1008

To Be Somebody.
(Great Depression) Many Americans, struggling to survive the Great Depression, were determined to help build a better America through direct action in the courts, in the Congress and in everyday life. At a time when lynchings, segregation, and anti-semitism were commonplace, black heavy-weight champion, Joe Louis became a symbol of national strength. In very different ways Louis and First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt challenged America to live up to its promise of justice and opportunity for people of every race and faith. 60 min. Video/C 3176

Trouble Behind.
White racism is discussed in the context of the town of Corbin, Ky., where on Oct. 31, 1919 a race riot drove all of the Black residents out of town. Since that date few Blacks have attempted to settle in Corbin. Residents are interviewed to give their perceptions of whether or not racism still exists in their town. 56 min. Video/C 3783

Description from California Newsreel catalog

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Up South: African-American Migration in the Era of the Great War (American Social History Project)
This film chronicles the migration of 500,000 African-Americans from the South to cities in the North between 1916 and 1921. Mississippians chose Chicago as their destination in the great migration. Their story is told through the recollections of migrants themselves and through letters, oral histories, songs, photographs and art. 30 min. DVD X2338; vhs Video/C 5834

W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices
In this film four prominent African-American writers each narrate a period in the life of the sociologist and author, W.E.B. Du Bois, and describe his impact on their work. They chronicle Du Bois' role as a founder of the NAACP, organizer of the first Pan-African Congress, editor of Crisis, a journal of the black cultural renaissance, and author of a series of landmark sociological studies. Anathematized during the McCarthy years, Du Bois immigrated to Ghana, the first independent African state, where he died. 1995. 116 min. DVD 3421; vhs Video/C 4058

Description from California Newsreel catalog

The Harlem Renaissance

A. Philip Randolph: For Jobs & Freedom.
Biography of the African American labor leader, journalist, and civil rights activist, A. Philip Randolph. Randolph won the first national labor agreement for a black union, The Sleeping Car porters. His threat of a protest march on Washington forced President Roosevelt to ban segregation in the federal government and defense industries at the onset of WWII and again he forced Truman to integrate the military. Finally with the 1963 March on Washington, Randolph succeeded in placing civil rights at the forefront of the nation's legislative agenda as he passed the torch to Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes music of the labor and civil rights movements. 86 min. DVD X4645; Video/C 4127

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Chenoweth, Karin. "The Man Who Pulled." (TV documentary on A. Philip Randolph, labor leader and Civil Rights activist) (includes related article) Black Issues in Higher Education v12, n24 (Jan 25, 1996):14 (4 pages).
Goodman, Walter. "A. Philip Randolph: For Jobs and Freedom." (television program reviews) New York Times v145 (Thu, Feb 1, 1996):B2(N), C18(L), col 2, 11 col in.

Africa to America to Paris: The Migration of Black Writers.
Traces the path of African-American literature from the shores of the U.S. to the Left Bank of Paris at the end of World War II through the late 1960s. The program provides context by first exploring the New Orleans salon poetry of Desdunes and then discussing the historic suppression of black activists in the U.S. after the Harlem Renaissance. This program primarily traces the lives of James Baldwin, Richard Wright and Chester Himes who immigrated to Paris seeking greater intellectual freedom. Includes remembrances of fellow artists and readings from their diaries and works. 1997. 53 min. Video/C 5624

Against the Odds: The Artists of the Harlem Renaissance
Documentary telling of the struggle of Black visual artists in the 1920's and1930's to show and sell their work. It describes the influence of the Harmon Foundation in creating an artistic home where Black visual artists flourished and developed a wide range of talent. Also included were items in the show curated by the Newark Museum to celebrate the work of the Foundation. Dist.: PBS. 57 min. DVD 6307; vhs Video/C 3889

ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

Alice Walker on Zora Neale Hurston.
Discussion and reading at the American Poetry Archives, San Francisco State University, 10/20/80. DVD 9809 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 1222

As I Remember It: A Portrait of Dorothy West.
This portrait of author West provides a fascinating glimpse into the African American middle class in the 20's and the New Negro Movement. Explores the forgotten role of women in the Harlem Renaissance. Directed by Salem Mekuria. Directed by Salem Mekuria. c1991. 56 min. Video/C 3373

Women Make Movies catalog description

[Bearden, Romare] Griots of Imagery: A Comment on the Art of Romare Bearden and Charles White.
A presentation on the art of two Afro-American artists who are true African keepers of history and culture or "griots", based on the 1993 exhibition of Romare Bearden and Charles White. Bearden's art is based on his reflections concerning what he called "the prevalence of ritual" in African-American life. White's art reflects his concern with the struggle of Black Americans to transcend the vissicitudes of American life. c1993. 28 min. Video/C 5271

[Bearden, Romare] Romare Bearden: Visual Jazz.
An intimate and personal look at the life and work of the bold, brilliant artist Romare Bearden who created collages and paintings of humanity in which he sought to "redefine the image of man" in terms of the African-American experience. Film includes rare footage of Bearden at work. 1995. 28 min. Video/C 5563

Bessie Smith and Friends.
Miscellaneous musical shorts, including the Nicholas Brothers, Eubie Blake, Teddy Wilson, and others. 39 min. Video/C 1990

Black Fiction in America Roger Rosenblatt.[AUDIO RECORDING]
Excerpted from Roger Rosenblatt's book: Black fiction. Cassette 1. Introduction -- Native Son (1940) / R. Wright -- Cassette 2. Native Son (1940) / R. Wright -- Go tell it on the mountain (1953) / J. Baldwin -- Cassette 3. Go tell it on the mountain (1953) / J. Baldwin -- Cane (1923) / J. Toomer -- Big boy leaves home (1938) / R. Wright --Home to Harlem (1927) / C. McKay -- Their eyes were watching God (1937) / Z. Hurston -- Best of Simple (1961) / L. Hughes -- Cassette 4. Not without laughter (1930) / L. Hughes -- Uncalled (1896) / P. Dunbar -- Cassette 5. -- Country place (1947) / A. Petry -- Dem (1967) / W. Kelley -- If he hollars let him go (1945) / C. Himes -- Cassette 6. Invisible man (1952) / R. Ellison. Harvard professor, Roger Rosenblatt, presents a fresh perspective on Black fiction written in America between 1890 and 1967. Sound/C 30

Black History Month 1992: Race and culture, Race and Identity.[AUDIO RECORDING]
Side B ("Race and identity"), Jeffrey C. Stewart and Hortense Spillers discuss ethnicity and the Harlem Renaissance social critic Alain Locke. 1992. c 30 min. Sound/C 1306

Black Jazz & Blues.
All-black musical shorts from 1929-1945, starring Duke Ellington, Fletcher Henderson, Billie Holliday, Louis Jordan, Bessie Smith, James P. Johnson, and others. 44 min. Video/C 1846

The Black King (aka Harlem Hot Shot) (1932)
Directed by Bud Pollard. Cast: A.B. Comathiers, Vivianne Baker, Knolly Mitchell, Dan Michaels, Mary Jane Watkins, Harry Gray, Mike Jackson, Lorenzo Tucker, Trixie Smith. One of the earliest films to focus on the Back-to-Africa movement and made by an independent white-owned company, it was billed as a satire on the life of Marcus Garvey. The main character, "Charcoal" Johnson, through connivance, becomes the minister/leader of a Logan, Mississippi congregation from which he attempts to extort money for a Back-to-Africa movement. He proclaims himself King of the United States of Africa. 70 min. DVD X29; vhs Video 999:929
Credits and other information from the Internet Movie Database

Larson, Charles R. "The Black King: Forgotten 'Black?' Classic." Journal of Popular Film and Television, vol. 20 no. 2. 1992 Summer. pp: 17-25.

Blue Melodies (1929-34; Hollywood Rhythm: Paramount Musical Shorts; 3)
Directed by Various, Paramount: Symphony in Black: A Rhapsody of Negro Life - Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday (1935); Those Blues - Vincent Lopez (1932); Ol' King Cotton - George Dewey Washington (1930); A Bundle of Blues - Duke Ellington, Ivie Anderson (1933); Jitterbug Party - Cab Calloway (1934); Her Future - Ethel Merman (1930); St. Louis Blues - Bessie Smith (1929); Blue of the Night - Bing Crosby (1933).Eight mini musicals featuring landmark performances by the legends of jazz and blues from the early years of sound film production. Bessie Smith stars in her only film, the once-notorious musical St. Louis Blues. Tennaged Billie Holiday performs with Duke Ellington's orchestra while another piece, Bundle of Blues, spotlights Ellington's favorite band singer, Ivie Anderson. And, months before her Broadway debut, a girlish Ethel Merman defends her life before a judge in Her Future. 85 min. vhs 999:1692

Brother to Brother (2004)
Written and directed by Rodney Evans. Cast: Anthony Mackie, Larry Gilliard Jr., Duane Boutte, Daniel Sunjata, Alex Burns. Critically acclaimed drama that invokes the glory days of the Harlem Renaissance. As an elderly man, poet Bruce Nugent meets a young, black, gay artist struggling to find his voice, and together they embark on a journey through his inspiring past. 90 min. DVD 3997
Credits and other information from the Internet Movie Database

Cosmopolis.(New York: A Documentary Film; episode 5)
Examines the roaring twenties in New York City as it becomes the cultural capital of the world with its hybrid cultural style that mixes high culture and low, black culture and white. This episode concludes with the skyscraper war, the rise & crash of the stock market and the construction of the Empire State Building. A film by Ric Burns. 1999. 120 min. DVD 3768; also VHS Video/C 6654

[Dubois, W.E.B.] W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices
In this film four prominent African-American writers each narrate a period in the life of the sociologist and author, W.E.B. Du Bois, and describe his impact on their work. They chronicle Du Bois' role as a founder of the NAACP, organizer of the first Pan-African Congress, editor of Crisis, a journal of the black cultural renaissance, and author of a series of landmark sociological studies. Anathematized during the McCarthy years, Du Bois immigrated to Ghana, the first independent African state, where he died. 1995. 116 min. DVD 3421; Video/C 4058

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Fitzgerald, Sharon. "W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices." (television program reviews) American Visions v12, n1 (Feb-March, 1997):34 (2 pages).
Goodman, Walter. "W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices." (television program reviews) New York Times v146, n38 (Fri, Feb 7, 1997):B24(N), B17(L), col 3, 13 col
Holloway, Jonathan Scott. "The Soul of W.E.B. Dubois." American Quarterly 1997 49(3): 603-614
Leonard, John. "W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices." (television program reviews) New York v30, n5 (Feb 10, 1997):115.

Duke Ellington and His Orchestra, 1929-1941: Stars of the Cotton Club.
Featuring Duke Ellington and his orchestra, Fredi Washington, Billie Holiday, and Whitey's Lindy Hoppers. 33 min. Video/C 1987

From These Roots: A Review of the Harlem Renaissance.
Uses still photographs and filmed sequences to recreate the social and political climate of the Harlem renaissance--a period of great artistic and cultural activity in the 1920's which had, and still has, a profound influence on black American art and self-awareness and life-style. 29 min. Video/C 2215

[Garvey, Marcus] Marcus Garvey Look For Me in the Whirlwind.
Uses a wealth of archival film, photographs and documents to uncover the story of Marcus Garvey, a Jamaican immigrant who between 1916 and 1921 built the largest black mass movement in world history. It explores his dramatic successes and failures before his fall into obscurity through interviews with people who witnessed the Garvey movement first hand more than 80 year ago as they communicate the appeal of Garvey's revolutionary ideas to a generation of African Americans. Directed by Stanley Nelson. Special DVD features: Interviews with director Stanley Nelson and editor Lewis Erskine; exclusive footage not included in the program; News articles from the Negro World; Audio recordings of Marcus Garvey speeches; video glossary of key terms from a panel of Garvey experts. 2001. 90 min. DVD X3312; Video/C 7807

[Garvey, Marcus] Marcus Garvey: Toward Black Nationhood
A documentary combining archival material and live interviews with Marcus Garvey, Jr., and others, which introduces the life and work of the pioneer Black nationalist leader Marcus Garvey. 45 min. Video/C 4137

The Harlem Renaissance: The Music & Rhythms That Started a Cultural Revolution
Featuring commentary from historians and the performers themselves, this program traces the roots of the music of the Harlem Renaissance, its social impact on society and its eventual acceptance in mainstream culture. Performances by Cab Calloway, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Nat King Cole, the Nicholas Brothers, Fats Waller, Bill Bojangles Robinson, Fletcher Henderson, the Mills Brothers, Sidney Bechet, Dorothy Dandridge, Lena Horne, Billy Eckstine. 2004. 75 min. DVD 3585

[Hughes, Langston] Hommage à Langston
This event took place at the Townsend Center, University of California, Berkeley, on February 1, 1999. Taped on sight by the Educational Television Office, University of California, Berkeley. The poet Ted Joans reads from the works of Langston Hughes with commentary on the Afro-American poet's life and work. 1999. 95 min. Video/C 6122

[Hughes, Langston]The Dream Keeper and Other Poems
Sound/C 1232

[Hughes, Langston] Hughes' Dream Harlem
Langston Hughes was one of the most prominent figures of the Harlem Renaissance and is often referred to as Harlem's poet laureate. This film shows how Hughes successfully fused jazz, blues and common speech to celebrate the beauty of Black life. This multi-layered documentary consists of spoken-word sessions, roundtable discussions and a tour of Hughes' Harlem hang-outs. 2002. 61 min. Video/C 9423

Description from California Newsreel catalog

[Hughes, Langston] Langston Hughes Reads and Talks About His Poems
Sound/C 92

[Hughes, Langston]Looking for Langston: A Meditation on Langston Hughes (1902-1907) and the Harlem Renaissance.
A tribute to Langston Hughes, this film attempts to reclaim him as an important black gay voice in American culture. Writer and director, Isaac Julien. With the poetry of Essex Hemphill and Bruce Nugent (1906-1987). A film by Isaac Julien.

"A visual tour-de-force, "Looking for Langston" is a beautiful and lyrical meditation of black and white gay identities. Using the life and work of Langston Hughes during the jazz/blues infused Harlem Renaissance of the 1920's, the film weaves together the poetry of Hughes and Essex Hempill, music, sylized dramatic sequences and archival material in a celebration of gay desire and a testament to contemporary society's attempt to shatter multiple identitites." [from Third World Newsreel (distributor) catalog] Extras: Full commentary with Isaac Julien and Nina Kellgren (film's director of photography) ; short film "Portrait in blue: Essex Hemphill" (Isaac Julien, 2005) ; "First and last words: Essex Hemphill and Larry Duckette in conversation," audio recording of 1990 radio program ; photo gallery. 1992. 45 min. DVD 8495; vhs Video/C 2911

[Hughes, Langston] Modern American Poets
Side 1: Langston Hughes (7 min.) Profiles of six American poets. Originally presented as radio "spots", a brief commentary on each writer is given, as well as excerpts from his works. Sound/C 572

[Hughes, Langston]Poetry and Reflections
From the books: One-way ticket and Shakespeare in Harlem by Langston Hughes. One way ticket (with commentary) -- Negro speaks of rivers (with commentary) ; Puzzled (with commentary) -- Trumpet player (with commentary) -- Ballad of the gypsy -- Kid sleepy -- Southern mammy songs -- Migrant(with commentary) -- Mama and daughter -- Sylvester's dying bed (with commentary) -- Interne at Provident Hospital (with commentary) -- Merry-go-round -- Ku Klux Klan -- The South -- Mulatto -- Out of work -- In explanation of our times -- Dinner guest: me -- Cultural exchange. The author reads selected poems and comments on his life, the themes of his poetry, and the problems of black people. Sound/C 648

[Hughes, Langston] The Poetry of Langston Hughes
Sound/C 689

[Hughes, Langston] Voices and Visions: Langston Hughes.
Video/C 1067: 3

[Hurson, Zora Neale]Zora is My Name!
A funny, stirring story based on the life of Zora Neale Hurston, one of the most distinctive writers of the American South and how a turn-of-the-century Black woman captured the folklore of the rural South. 90 min. Video/C 1838

[Hurson, Zora Neale]Zora Neale Hurston: Jump at the Sun
Zora Neale Hurston, path-breaking novelist, pioneering anthropologist and one of the first black women to enter the American literary canon (Their Eyes Were Watching God), established the African American vernacular as one of the most vital, inventive voices in American literature. This definitive film biography, eighteen years in the making, portrays Zora in all her complexity: gifted, flamboyant, and controversial but always fiercely original. Intersperses insights from leading scholars and rare footage of the rural South (some of it shot by Zora herself) with re-enactments of a revealing 1943 radio interview. Director, Sam Pollard. 2008. 83 min. DVD X253

Description from California Newsreel catalog

[Hurson, Zora Neale][Recordings of] Zora Neale Hurston [AUDIO RECORDING]
Title on accompanying pamphlet: Songs sung by Zora Neale Hurston. Afro-American folk songs, blues and worksongs. Songs duplicated by the Library of Congress, Archive of Folk Culture. MUSI CA1694 (Music Library)

I Remember Harlem.
Traces the rise, decline, and regeneration of America's largest Black community over three centuries. 60 min. ea. Video/C 527:1-4

I'll Make Me a World: Without Fear or Shame: 1920-1937.1999.
This program discusses the lives of African-American leaders W.E.B DuBois, A. Philip Randolph, and Marcus Garvey; the Harlem Renaissance and its major figures, such as Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, and women blues singers; and examines the conflicts which arose over what art should express when community leaders seek to use it in the struggle for racial justice. (For other parts of this series, see African American Studies videography) 1999. 57 min. Video/C 6263

In Black & White
Using archival newsreels, feature film footage and interviews with Afro-American actors and directors, this film explores the inception, struggle, suppression, and survival of the Black Cinema from the 1920s through the 1950s. This detailed documentary, a stinging indictment of racism in the arts and in American culture, examines the lives and influence of Paul Robeson, Josephine Baker, Oscar Micheaux, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Marcus Garvey and many others on Afro-American cinema. 1992. 92 min. Video/C 5501

[Johnson, James Weldon] God's Trombones
Poems read by Bryce Bond with background music for piano composed and performed by William Martin. The creation -- The judgment day -- Let my people go -- The prodigal son -- Go down, death -- Listen Lord, a prayer -- Noah built the ark. Sound/C 1239

Literature of the Black Experience [AUDIO RECORDING]
Notes: Contents: Side 1. W.E.B. Du Bois (8 min.) Langston Hughes (7 min.) Ralph Ellison (7 min.) Alice Walker (4 min.) -- Side 2. Alice Walker (cont.) (2 min.) Imamu Amiri Baraka (10 min.) Richard Wright (7 min.) Profiles of six Black American writers and literary figures. Originally presented as radio "spots", a brief commentary on each writer is given, as well as excerpts from his or her works. 44 min. Sound/C 566

Looking for Langston: A Meditation on Langston Hughes (1902-1907) and the Harlem Renaissance.
A tribute to Langston Hughes, this film attempts to reclaim him as an important black gay voice in American culture. Writer and director, Isaac Julien. With the poetry of Essex Hemphill and Bruce Nugent (1906-1987). A film by Isaac Julien.

"A visual tour-de-force, "Looking for Langston" is a beautiful and lyrical meditation of black and white gay identities. Using the life and work of Langston Hughes during the jazz/blues infused Harlem Renaissance of the 1920's, the film weaves together the poetry of Hughes and Essex Hempill, music, sylized dramatic sequences and archival material in a celebration of gay desire and a testament to contemporary society's attempt to shatter multiple identitites." [from Third World Newsreel (distributor) catalog] Extras: Full commentary with Isaac Julien and Nina Kellgren (film's director of photography) ; short film "Portrait in blue: Essex Hemphill" (Isaac Julien, 2005) ; "First and last words: Essex Hemphill and Larry Duckette in conversation," audio recording of 1990 radio program ; photo gallery. 1992. 45 min. DVD 8495; vhs Video/C 2911

[Micheaux, Oscar]Midnight Ramble: Oscar Micheaux and the Story of Race Movies..
Recounts the story of race movies produced for Afro-Americans from the 1920s through 1950 and the role played by Oscar Micheaux, the leading Afro-American producer and director. These movies were designed for Afro-Americans and were frequently shown at midnight. They presented Afro-Americans in a positive light. Featuring interviews with Afro-American actors and actresses, and historians. 58 min. DVD X1111; vhs Video/C 3614

Bibliography of books and articles about Micheaux in the UC Berkeley Library

The Movies Race and Ethnicity for MRC Micheaux holdings

Listing of Micheaux websites
Information on Micheaux from the Internet Movie Database
Midnight Ramble: The Negro in Early Hollwood
Black Folks Make Movies website

[Micheaux, Oscar]Oscar Micheaux, Film Pioneer.
Oscar Micheaux is remembered for his work as a pioneer producer-director whose films offered a positive image and an alternative for African Americans in the 1920s and 1930s. The program is built around the on-camera reminiscences of two performers who appeared in Micheaux films: Bee Freeman, and Lorenzo Tucker. Also included are dramatic reenactments of Micheaux directing and touring the country to sell his films. Dramatic sequences: Danny Glover (as Micheaux). c1981. 28 min. Video/C 8264

Bibliography of books and articles about Micheaux in the UC Berkeley Library

The Movies Race and Ethnicity for MRC Micheaux holdings

Listing of Micheaux websites
Information on Micheaux from the Internet Movie Database
Midnight Ramble: The Negro in Early Hollwood
Black Folks Make Movies website

The "New Negro" Arts Movement (Art: Transatlantic Modernism)
Between WWI and WWII nearly 2 million blacks migrated to Harlem making it an exciting and culturally rich neighborhood. Although there was still much bigotry directed towards blacks it was the first time that America saw the potential for major art to come out of a great black community. Here Professor Corn shows numerous examples of African-Americans being "in vogue" in the 20's -- one example is famed dancer Josephine Baker, whose high moment of fame in Paris -- "Revue Negre" made her a symbol of the "new woman." 1998. 60 min. Video/C 7276

New York: Episode Five, Cosmopolis
Directed by Ric Burns The final segment in a 5-part series chronicling the history of New York City from 1609 through 1930. Segment 5: Examines the roaring twenties in New York City as it becomes the cultural capital of the world with its hybrid cultural style that mixes high culture and low, black culture and white. This episode concludes with the skyscraper war, the rise & crash of the stock market and the construction of the Empire State Building. 1999. 120 min. Video/C 6654

Rhapsodies in Black: Music and Words from the Harlem Renaissance [SOUND RECORDING]
Musical works originally issued on analog 78rpm discs. Recorded 1918-34 (music) and 1999-2000 (readings). "The only collection in existence documenting the music, art and literature of the new negro of the Harlem Renaissance featuring digitally restored original recordings as well as new readings of renaissance literature plus a book containing rare previously unpublished photos, artwork and writings." Performers Quincy Jones, Duke Ellington, Ethel Waters, Eubie Blake, Mamie Smith, Bessie Smith, Ma Rainey, Paul Robeson, Paul Whiteman, Lou Rawls, Leadbelly, Louis Armstong, Fats Waller, Gregory Hines, Cab Calloway, Fletcher Henderson, Claude Hopkins, Eartha Kitt. Sound/D 87

That's Black Entertainment, part I: Race Movies: The Early History of Black Cinema with Three Original Short Films
Contents: Race movies: the popular art of the Black Renaissance (1985, 20 min.) -- "St Louis blues" starring Bessie Smith (1929, ca. 15 min.) -- "Hi-de-ho" starring Cab Calloway (1935, ca. 10 min.) -- "Boogie-woogie dream" starring Lena Horne (1941, ca. 13 min.). The first film, Race movies, explores the involvement of black filmmakers in filmmaking from its earliest days through the 1920s, with particular emphasis on the work of James Weldon Johnson, Oscar Micheaux, and Richard D. Maurice. Focus is on the movies that were made and production companies that produced them, including the Lincoln Motion Picture Company of Los Angeles, Micheaux Pictures Corporation and the Norman Film Manufacturing Company. Concludes with three shorts that were shown in movie houses prior to feature presentations. 59 min. Video/C 4837

History to 1940 to 1950

761st, The Story of the Black Panther Tank Battalion
The 761st Tank Battalion, the first unit to enlist African-American soldiers to operate armored vehicles was activated on April 1, 1942, at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana and deployed to Europe, landing at Omaha Beach in France on October 10, 1944. Over the course of 183 days of continuous fighting (including action in the Battle of the Bulge) the "Black Panthers" became the first African-American armored unit to enter combat. With the motto "Come Out Fighting!" they faced racism at home and death overseas in a war for many freedoms they did not enjoy in America. Directed by Pete Chatmon. 200-? 72 min. DVD X5625

African American Soldiers & Japanese Internment During WWII
Contents: Challenge to democracy / U.S. Office of War Information, Domestic Branch, Bureau of Motion Pictures (1944, 17 min.) -- Close harmony / sponsored by General Motors (1942, 11 min.) -- Farmer Henry Browne / U.S. Dept of Agriculture (1942, 11 min.) -- Japanese relocation / U.S. Office of War Information, Domestic Branch, Bureau of Motion Pictures (1943, 9 min.) -- Negro colleges in wartime / U.S. Office of War Information, Domestic Branch, Bureau of Motion Pictures (1943, 9 min.).

Challenge to democracy: The Internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II is here explained according to the Government's point of view. Close harmony: Attempts to show the need for good labor/management relations in the U.S. arms industry, resorting to the "step 'n fetch it" stereotype of Black Americans. Farmer Henry Browne: Shows how a black Georgian farmer does his part for the war, with his farm, his family and the service of his Tuskegee fighter pilot eldest son. Japanese relocation: A propaganda film designed to show the co-operation and satisfaction of the Japanese American internees in terms of being relocated, re-employed, re-educated and interned. Negro colleges in wartime: An exposition of the teaching and training of Black Americans for war, science, industry, agriculture, husbandry, meteorology, medicine, engineering and technical trades at black colleges. 57 min. DVD 2253

From Swastika to Jim Crow
Before and during the Second World War Jewish scholars who escaped Nazi Germany and immigrated to the U.S. faced anti-Semitism at major universities and a public distrust of foreigners, so a significant number secured teaching positions at historically Black colleges in the South. In many cases they formed lasting relationships with their students and had an important impact on the communities in which they lived. This is a story of two cultures, each sharing a burden of oppression, brought together by the tragic circumstances of war. 1999. 57 min. Video/C 7866

Description from California Newsreel catalog

Liberators: Fighting on Two Fronts in World War II.
Tells the unknown story of African-American battalions who helped liberate the concentration camps and combat the Nazis. The experiences of African-American soldiers in World War II reflected the racial climate of the 1940s America. Dist.: Direct Cinema. 90 min. Video/C 2849

The Negro Soldier (1943)
Supervisor, Frank Capra; director, Capt. Stuart Heisler. Traces the role of the Negro soldier in American history from 1776 to 1944, and shows the accomplishments of Negro troops. Written by Carlton Moss. 49 min. DVD 8798; also DVD 8711; vhs Video/C 2176
Credits and other information from the American Film Institute Catalog (UCB users only)

Watch this film online (via the Internet Moving Image Archive)

Port Chicago Mutiny: A National Tragedy.
Documentary film, using a combination of interviews with participants, still photographs, and testimony from the trial, about the Port Chicago mutiny. The mutiny trial followed the worst home-front disaster of WWII, the deaths of 320 men in a munitions explosion at Port Chicago. The seamen loading the munitions were black and the officers in charge were white. Afterwards, the seamen who had not been working at the time of the explosion refused to return to loading munitions under the same conditions. Fifty were charged, not with disobeying an order, but with mutiny, a crime punishable by death. Narrator: Danny Glover. Interviews: Joseph Small (found guilty of mutiny), Robert Routh (injured in initial explosion), Percy Robinson (returned to work), Gerald Veltmann (defense attorney). Based on the book by Robert L. Allen, "Port Chicago Mutiny", Warner Books, 1989. c1990. 49 min. DVD X487 [preservation copy]; vhs Video/C 6912

[Randolph, A. Philip] A. Philip Randolph: For Jobs & Freedom.
Biography of the African American labor leader, journalist, and civil rights activist, A. Philip Randolph. Randolph won the first national labor agreement for a black union, The Sleeping Car porters. His threat of a protest march on Washington forced President Roosevelt to ban segregation in the federal government and defense industries at the onset of WWII and again he forced Truman to integrate the military. Finally with the 1963 March on Washington, Randolph succeeded in placing civil rights at the forefront of the nation's legislative agenda as he passed the torch to Martin Luther King, Jr. Includes music of the labor and civil rights movements. Director: Dante James. 86 min. DVD X4645; Video/C 4127

Description from California Newsreel catalog


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